About Zalehah Turner

Zalehah Turner is a Sydney based poet, photographer, cultural journalist, and Associate Editor of Rochford Street Review (RSR). Zalehah regularly contributes articles and interviews on poetry, art, film, and new media for RSR and the UTS magazine, Vertigo. Zalehah’s poetry was projected onto the Federation Square Wall in Melbourne as part of the Overload Poetry Festivals, 2008 and 2009; exhibited at Mark and Remark ,107 Projects, Redfern in 2013; and displayed in Alice Springs and Moruya thanks to Australian Poetry Café poets, Laurie May and Janette Dadd respectively. Her poems have been published in Writing Laboratory (2013), Sotto (2013), Social Alternatives (2016), Vertigo (2016, 2017), UTS’s The Empathy Poems Project (2017) and Rochford Street Review (2017). She co-judged the New Shoots Poetry Prizes 2016 alongside, Tamryn Bennett, Artistic Director of The Red Room Company, and published the winning and highly commended poems. Zalehah is currently working on an intermedia poetry collection entitled, 'Critical condition', focused on the interstitial threshold between life and death in medical crises based on personal experience. Zalehah holds a BA in Communication with a major in writing and cultural studies from the University of Technology, Sydney where she continues to pursue pushing the boundaries of multimedia poetry in Honours (Communication- Creative Writing).

Featured Writer Erik Lindner: Biographical Note

Erik Lindner. photograph by Gerald Zörner

Erik Lindner. photograph by Gerald Zörner

 

Erik Lindner, poet, writer, and literary critic, was born in 1968 in The Hague, Netherlands. He has published five volumes of poetry, including his debut collection, Tramontane (Uitgeverij Perdu, 1996), and the novel, Naar Whitebridge. His most recent collection of poetry, Acedia, was published in Amsterdam by De Bezige Bij in 2014. His poetry has been translated in several different languages; with translations of his poems appearing in poetry anthologies published in France, Germany and Italy, and on Poetry International and lyrikline. Erik is editor of Terras magazine [http://tijdschriftterras.nl/] and lives and works as a freelance writer in Amsterdam.

website: http://www.eriklindner.nl/

Featured Writer Erik Lindner: ‘One Poem’

 

 

Featured Writer Erik Lindner: ‘One Poem’

The sea is purple at Piraeus.

A flag creeps out of the campanile
when the wind turns.

A man steps over a dog.
A woman stoops to rub her eyelid.

In an umbrella shop an umbrella falls off the counter.

A pigeon perching on a narrow branch
falls off, flutters, and settles again.
The berry out of reach at the end of the twig.
The branch that bends, the ruff that bulges when the pigeon shuffles along.

A girl gets on the metro with a desk drawer.

On the thick sand by the breakers
an angler slides his rod out horizontally
a bike beside him on its kickstand.

He stands with legs apart as if he’s peeing.
Birds’ footprints in the sand.
The rod arches over the sea.

– Erik Lindner

translated from Dutch by Francis Jones

 

De zee is paars bij Piraeus.

Een vlag kruipt uit de klokkentoren
als de wind draait.

Een man stapt over een hond.
Een vrouw wrijft gebogen over haar ooglid.

In een parapluwinkel valt een paraplu van de toonbank.

Op een smalle tak zit een duif
die erafvalt, fladdert en opnieuw gaat zitten
de bes die te ver op het uiteinde van de twijg zit
de tak die doorbuigt, de kraag die opbolt als de duif verschuift.

Een meisje stapt in de metro met een bureaula.

Op het dikke zand aan de branding
schuift een visser horizontaal zijn hengel uit
een fiets staat naast hem op de standaard.

Hij staat wijdbeens alsof hij plast.
Vogelpootafdrukken in het zand.
De hengel kromt boven de zee.

– Erik Lindner

 

This untitled poem by Erik Lindner was first published in his fourth collection of poetry, Terrein (De Bezige Bij, Amsterdam, 2010). It has since been translated into several different languages and was published on lyrikline in 2014 and the Poetry International Web in 2016. The original poem in Dutch, alongside the translation into English by Francis Jones, has been republished in Rochford Street Review with the author’s permission.

 

“The more I travel, the more I notice that poetry in every country, means something different. And then I mean, not only what it consists of, even where that is understood. In every country, poetry is presented differently, it takes another place in the culture. What is understood by poetry seems to say something characteristic about that culture. I gather impressions that illustrate this idea: experiences, anecdotes, messages and letters. Images of what I find in the street, meetings. Sometimes it’s not about poetry at all.”

– Erik Lindner

 

Erik Lindner reads ‘De zee is paars bij Piraeus’ (Literaturwerkstatt Berlin, 2014) published on lyrikline: https://www.lyrikline.org/en/poems/de-zee-paars-bij-piraeus-5879#.WgfG-MaWbIU


 

Erik Lindner. photograph by Gerald Zörner

Erik Lindner. photograph by Gerald Zörner

Erik Lindner, poet, writer, and literary critic, was born in 1968 in The Hague, Netherlands. He has published five volumes of poetry, including his debut collection, Tramontane (Uitgeverij Perdu, 1996), and the novel, Naar Whitebridge. His most recent collection of poetry, Acedia, was published in Amsterdam by De Bezige Bij in 2014. His poetry has been translated in several different languages; with translations of his poems appearing in poetry anthologies published in France, Germany and Italy, and on Poetry International and lyrikline. Erik is editor of Terras magazine [http://tijdschriftterras.nl/] and lives and works as a freelance writer in Amsterdam.

website: http://www.eriklindner.nl/

 

 

Featured Writer Marra PL. Lanot: One Poem

Soldier’s Song

Let the hills and mountains
Roll up behind me like
The tangled past of a jungle.
Let a rose grow when
I lay down my gun
Where the desert meets the shore.

I long to throw away
This mask of maleness,
All male desire to kill,
To spit the blood, the sour –
Ness balled in my mouth.
I have forgotten the face
Of my mother, sister, niece.
All I see are trenches
Hate burrowed in my brother’s face,
His eyes, two barrels of a gun
Unleashing bullets.
I have learned that foes
May become friends tomorrow
And friends my foes tonight.

This season I may own a
Bowl of rice, next year
I might bite a fruit
Or have a new dress
Or a roof over our heads.
But I remember home
Each time a child
Presses a cheek to mine
Or even when a horse
Gives birth and goats
Cavort in a manger.

Let the hills and mountains
Roll up behind me like
The tangled past of a jungle.
Let a rose grow when
I lay down my gun
Where the desert meets the shore.

-Marra PL. Lanot

 

‘Soldier’s Song’ by Marra PL. Lanot was first published in Asiaweek and then included in Marra’s fourth collection of poetry, Witch’s Dance at Iba Pang Tula sa Filipino at Español (2000, Anvil Publishing). Marra PL. Lanot is a multilingual poet who wrote ‘Soldier’s Song’ in English. Witch’s Dance contains in poems written in English, Tagalog, and Spanish. Rochford Street Review is proud to republish ‘Soldier’s Song’ with the permission of the author.


 

Marra PL. Lanot. photograph by Ed Lejano

Marra PL. Lanot. photograph by Ed Lejano

Marra PL. Lanot is a Filipino poet, essayist, and a freelance journalist who writes in Filipino, English, and Spanish. She has published several books, including five collections of poetry, three collections of profiles, and a book of essays, in addition to co-writing several teleplays. She previously taught literature, creative writing, and film at the University of the Philippines, her alma mater. She also served as Associate Artistic Director of the Cultural Center of the Philippines as well as Board Member of the Movie and Television Rating and Classification Board. She has won several awards for her work, including the Catholic Mass Media Award, and the prestigious Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards for Literature. She received second prize for Poetry in the Palanca Awards for her first collection of poetry, Sheaves of Things Burning (1967). Her fifth collection of poetry, Riding the Full Moon in Filipino and Spanish, continues to demonstrate her ability to write in multiple languages as does her forthcoming collection, Cadena de Amor, New and Selected Poems in English, Filipino, and Spanish, due to be published this year.

 

Featured Writer Marra PL. Lanot: Biographical Note

Marra PL. Lanot. photograph by Ed Lejano

Marra PL. Lanot. photograph by Ed Lejano

 

Marra PL. Lanot is a Filipino poet, essayist, and a freelance journalist who writes in Filipino, English, and Spanish. She has published several books, including five collections of poetry, three collections of profiles, and a book of essays, in addition to co-writing several teleplays. She previously taught literature, creative writing, and film at the University of the Philippines, her alma mater. She also served as Associate Artistic Director of the Cultural Center of the Philippines as well as Board Member of the Movie and Television Rating and Classification Board. She has won several awards for her work, including the Catholic Mass Media Award, and the prestigious Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards for Literature. She received second prize for Poetry in the Palanca Awards for her first collection of poetry, Sheaves of Things Burning (1967). Her fifth collection of poetry, Riding the Full Moon in Filipino and Spanish, continues to demonstrate her ability to write in multiple languages as does her forthcoming collection, Cadena de Amor, New and Selected Poems in English, Filipino, and Spanish due to be published this year.

Featured Writer Marra PL. Lanot: ‘Soldier’s Song’

 

Featured Writer Maarja Kangro: One Poem

Asbestos

So, as a child, you say?
You jumped,
and the pile of Eternit cracked?
Blue sneakers, white chrysotile.
I saw the enlargement
of a 10 micrometre fiber
entering the respiratory system.
A piece of Eternit
was meant to be smoked fish?
You nibbled at it
like original sin?
Like the tree of the knowledge of good and evil:
actually, you don’t feel anything,
don’t understand much,
10μm, a construction worker in filthy trousers,
an agony of an ignorant mind,
20 or 40 years, pleural plaques, mesothelioma,
scar tissue in the lungs.
Yes, every year, it seems, the lilac blooms,
and sometimes a big passion.
The fiber descends very slowly,
invisibly like the future.
A great allegory, asbestos.
Oh, don’t be mad now!
Look, this is my new favourite wine.
I’ll buy. Let’s have a glass tonight.

-Maarja Kangro

Translated from Estonian by Brandon Lussier and the author, Maarja Kangro

 

Asbest

Ah et juba lapsena?
Hüppasid,
ja eterniidivirn pragises?
Sinised tennised, valge krüsotiil.
Nägin suurendust,
kuidas 10-mikromeetrine kiud
tungib hingamisteedesse.
Eterniiditükk
oli mängult suitsukala?
Näksisite
nagu pärispattu?
Nagu hea ja kurja tundmise puud:
tegelikult ei tunne ju midagi,
aru ei saa suurt millestki,
10μm, räpastes pükstes ehitaja,
aimuta inimese agoonia,
20 või 40 aastat, pleuranaastud, mesotelioom,
sidekoestunud kops.
Jah, igal aastal justkui õitseb sirel
ja mõnikord suur kirg.
Kiud laskub väga aeglaselt
ja nähtamatult nagu tulevik:
asbest on vägev allegooria.
Oh, mis sa vihastad!
Näe, siin on mu uus lemmikvein.
Ma ostan. Teeme õhtul klaasikese.

-Maarja Kangro

 

Asbest’ by Maarja Kangro was first published in Estonian in the magazine Looming (2009) and was also included in her poetry collection Kunstiteadlase jõulupuu (The Christmas Tree of an Art Scholar) published by Eesti Keele Sihtasutus in 2010. The English translation, ‘Asbestos’ was first published on lyrikline.org. The original poem, ‘Asbest’, alongside the English translation, ‘Asbestos’, have been republished in Rochford Street Review with the author’s permission.


 

Maarja Kangro photograph by Jüri Kolk copy

Maarja Kangro. photograph by Jüri Kolk

Maarja Kangro is an Estonian poet, author, and translator who has been described as one of the most formidable voices in contemporary Estonia. By the age of forty, she had won many of the important literary awards in Estonia. In 2006, she published her first book of poems, Kurat õrnal lumel (A Devil on Tender Snow), as well as, a children’s book, Puuviljadraakon (Fruit Dragon), illustrated by her sister, Kirke Kangro. Puuviljadraakon also received the Estonian Children’s Literature Centre’s Best Book of the Year Award in 2006. She won the Tallinn University Literary Award for her second and third collections of poems: Tule mu koopasse, mateeria (Come into my Cave, Matter) in 2008 and Heureka (Eureka) in 2009. She received the Estonian Cultural Endowment’s Literary Award for poetry in 2009 for Heureka, as well as, for prose in 2011 for Ahvid ja solidaarsus (Monkeys and Solidarity). She has also written several opera librettos, a cantata, and a multimedia work, To Define Happiness.

 

Featured Writer Maarja Kangro: Biographical Note

Maarja Kangro photograph by Jüri Kolk copy

Maarja Kangro. photograph by Jüri Kolk

 

Maarja Kangro is an Estonian poet, author, and translator who has been described as one of the most formidable voices in contemporary Estonia. By the age of forty, she had won many of the important literary awards in Estonia. In 2006, she published her first book of poems, Kurat õrnal lumel (A Devil on Tender Snow), as well as, a children’s book, Puuviljadraakon (Fruit Dragon), illustrated by her sister, Kirke Kangro. Puuviljadraakon also received the Estonian Children’s Literature Centre’s Best Book of the Year Award in 2006. She won the Tallinn University Literary Award for her second and third collections of poems: Tule mu koopasse, mateeria (Come into my Cave, Matter) in 2008 and Heureka (Eureka) in 2009. She received the Estonian Cultural Endowment’s Literary Award for poetry in 2009 for Heureka, as well as, for prose in 2011 for Ahvid ja solidaarsus (Monkeys and Solidarity). She has also written several opera librettos, a cantata, and a multimedia work, To Define Happiness.

Featured Writer Maarja Kangro: ‘Asbestos’ (‘Asbest’)

 

Featured Writer Ingrid Fichtner: One Poem

‘Thinking about Things’ and ‘So nachdenken’ “were ‘born’ at the same time; in a way, both versions are originals. Which makes me think right now – one could view any poem as a kind of translation, within one language usually … When I’m in touch with English-speaking friends, I sometimes start out writing a poem in English. And in this case, I actually prefer the English version.” – Ingrid Fichtner

 

Thinking about Things

and how they threaten you
you try to fight
you try to vanish
you fail
you try again
you are not failing any better
you try to change your mind
and your perception
is still misleading you
you try again
you shut your eyes –
might the adventure then lead you
to castles and maybe in Spain –
your ears cannot shut off the windmills
you try to reconsider things
you fall in love with them

 

So nachdenken

über die Dinge
und wie sie dich bedrohen
du versuchst ihnen zu trotzen
du versuchst dich ihnen zu entziehen
doch du scheiterst
du versuchst es wieder
und du scheiterst gar nicht besser
du möchtest sie gern anders sehen
deine Wahrnehmung
führt dich noch immer in die Irre
du versuchst es wieder –
könnte dieses Abenteuer dich
vielleicht zu Schlössern führen und seien sie aus Luft –
deine Ohren können Windmühlen nicht abstellen
du versuchst die Dinge neu zu überdenken
und verliebst dich schlicht in sie

-Ingrid Fichtner

Ingrid Fichtner wrote ‘Thinking about Things’ (‘So nachdenken’) bilingually, in English and German, respectively.


 

Ingrid Fichtner. photograph by Rahul Soni

Ingrid Fichtner. photograph by Rahul Soni

Ingrid Fichtner was born in Judenburg, Austria and has been living in Switzerland since 1985. Ingrid is an award-winning poet who has written seven books of poetry, two libretti, and works as a freelance translator. She has won awards and scholarships from the City of Zurich and Pro Helvetia through her collections of poetry including, Lichte Landschaft (2012), Luftblaumesser (2004), Das Wahnsinnige am Binden Schuhe (2000), and Farbtreiben (1999). Her most recent book of poems is Von weitem (Wolfbach, Zürich 2014). Translations of her poetry have appeared in journals and anthologies in English, French, Polish, Spanish, and Malayalam. She has a Master of Arts from Vienna University.

website: http://www.ingridfichtner.ch

 

Featured Writer Ingrid Fichtner: Biographical Note

Ingrid Fichtner. photograph by Rahul Soni

Ingrid Fichtner. photograph by Rahul Soni

 

Ingrid Fichtner was born in Judenburg, Austria and has been living in Switzerland since 1985. Ingrid is an award-winning poet who has written seven books of poetry, two libretti, and works as a freelance translator. She has won awards and scholarships from the City of Zurich and Pro Helvetia through her collections of poetry including, Lichte Landschaft (2012), Luftblaumesser (2004), Das Wahnsinnige am Binden Schuhe (2000), and Farbtreiben (1999). Her most recent book of poems is Von weitem (Wolfbach, Zürich 2014). Translations of her poetry have appeared in journals and anthologies in English, French, Polish, Spanish, and Malayalam. She has a Master of Arts from Vienna University.

website: http://www.ingridfichtner.ch

Featured Writer Ingrid Fichtner: ‘Thinking about Things’ (‘So nachdenken’)

Featured Writer Lidija Dimkovska (Лидија Димковска): Biographical Note

!Lidija Dimkovska photograph by Tihomir Pintar

Lidija Dimkovska. photograph by Tihomir Pintar

 

Lidija Dimkovska (Лидија Димковска) was born in Skopje, Macedonia, and currently lives in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Lidija is a poet, novelist, essayist, and translator of Romanian and Slovenian literature into Macedonian. She has published six books of poetry, three novels and edited three anthologies. Lidija has won numerous literary prizes including, the Hubert Burda literary prize for young East European poets (2009), the Tudor Arghezi international poetry prize in Romania (2012), the Macedonian Writers’ Union award twice, and the European Union Prize for Literature (2013) for her novel, A Spare Life (РЕЗЕРВЕН ЖИВОТ). Her book of poems, pH Neutral History, was translated into English by Ljubica Arsovska and Peggy Reid. Her books have been translated into more than twenty languages and she has participated at numerous international literary festivals.

Featured Writer Lidija Dimkovska (Лидија Димковска): ‘Echo’ (‘Ехо’)

 

Featured Writer Lidija Dimkovska (Лидија Димковска): One Poem

Echo

Under the primordial house
the echo was returning from this world,
flying over the quince, the strings of tobacco leaves
and the brandy in the cauldron,
bringing us greetings from our nearest and dearest.
We were all alive then.
The bladder of the slaughtered piglets
was the toughest ball in the world,
the soup made from the old cockerel
was refused even by the hogs,
at the bottom of the soap pot
a rainbow would suddenly appear.
The cultures of the world rang out
on Macedonian Radio, Third Programme,
in the room filled with the smell of baked pumpkin
and socks drying above the stove,
where granny knitted a woollen waistcoat for me,
suitable for all seasons of the year.
When I outgrew it I left for the world
and lived in it in black and white,
mixing blood with water –
I didn’t notice when it turned to spit,
just like the primordial house,
which was first a home,
then a property with a tax rate,
and eventually a ruin in a lawsuit.
Now we shout and shout under the house,
and the echo returns from world beyond,
flying over the graves and dung heaps
bringing us greetings from ourselves.

– Lidija Dimkovska

translated from Macedonian by Ljubica Arsovska and Patricia Marsh

 

Ехо

Под примордијалната куќа
ехото се враќаше од овој свет,
прелетувајќи ги дуњата, низите тутун
и ракијата во казанот,
ни носеше поздрави од ближните.
Живи бевме тогаш сите.
Мочниот меур на закланите младенчиња
беше најиздржлив балон на светот,
супата од остарениот петел
не сакаа да ја јадат ни свињите,
на дното од котелот за сапун
ненадејно се појавуваше ѕуница.
Ѕунеа светските култури
на Македонско радио, Трета програма,
во одајата со мирис на печена тиква
и чорапи испружени над шпоретот,
кај што баба ми ми сплете волнено елече
погодно за секое годишно време.
Кога ми омале заминав во светот
и живеев во него црно на бело,
крвта мешајќи ја со вода
не сетив кога се претвори во плунка
исто како што примордијалната куќа
најпрво беше дом,
па имот со даночна стапка,
па руина во судски спор.
Сега под куќата викаме ли викаме,
а ехото се враќа од оној свет,
прелетувајќи ги гробовите и буништата
ни носи поздрави од самите себе.

– Лидија Димковска (Lidija Dimkovska)

‘Exo’ was published in Lidija Dimkovska’s collection of poetry, Црно на бело (In Black and White, Ili-Ili, 2016). It has been republished in Rochford Street Review with the author’s permission, along with the first English translation, ‘Echo’.

______________________________________________________________________

 

!Lidija Dimkovska photograph by Tihomir Pintar

Lidija Dimkovska. photograph by Tihomir Pintar                                                                                                                                                                             

Lidija Dimkovska (Лидија Димковска) was born in Skopje, Macedonia, and currently lives in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Lidija is a poet, novelist, essayist, and translator of Romanian and Slovenian literature into Macedonian. She has published six books of poetry, three novels and edited three anthologies. Lidija has won numerous awards including, the Hubert Burda literary prize for young East European poets (2009), the Tudor Arghezi international poetry prize in Romania (2012), the Macedonian Writers’ Union award twice, and the European Union Prize for Literature (2013) for her novel, A Spare Life (РЕЗЕРВЕН ЖИВОТ). Her book of poems, pH Neutral History, was translated into English by Ljubica Arsovska and Peggy Reid. Her books have been translated into more than twenty languages and she has participated at numerous international literary festivals
.