Rochford Street Review Needs Your Support in 2017.

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As we enter 2017 Rochford Street Review urgently needs your help. Over the past five years we have published over 550 reviews and articles on Australian books, visual arts, film and music and we have had over 132,000 page views. Although we receive no government or other institutional support we attempt to offer all our reviewers at least a token payment.

But to keep going for another 12 months we need your support. January is the month when many of our bills fall due. The total is almost $200 in domain registration fees and various Word Press subscriptions we need to maintain the site. We also want to be able to continue to offer at least a token payment to our valuable reviewers (and we aim to try to increase this amount) and ensure the site remains free to access.

If you can please consider making either a one-off donation or becoming a supporting subscriber and make a small donation each month.

In the current anti-art/ anti-culture environment it is vital that independent journals like Rochford Street Review continue to survive and to question the status quo. We can only do this with your help.

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Rochford Street Review would also like to thank the following people and organisations who have supported us over the last twelve months:

  • Ian Gibbins
  • Janette Dadd
  • Robyn Rowland
  • Entirely Beautiful Books
  • Jim Walton
  • Linda Godfrey
  • Michele Seminara
  • Anna Couani
  • Sarah St Vincent Welch
  • Annette Marfording
  • Helen Nickas
  • Georgina Woods
  • Grant Caldwell
  • Richard Tipping

There have also been a handful of anonymous together with reviewers, writers and donations who have donated their payments back to the Review. These generous donations have allowed us to pay our postage and other associated fees over the course of the year and to also offer our writers a small token payment for their work.

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Featured Writer Erik Lindner: Biographical Note

Erik Lindner. photograph by Gerald Zörner

Erik Lindner. photograph by Gerald Zörner

 

Erik Lindner, poet, writer, and literary critic, was born in 1968 in The Hague, Netherlands. He has published five volumes of poetry, including his debut collection, Tramontane (Uitgeverij Perdu, 1996), and the novel, Naar Whitebridge. His most recent collection of poetry, Acedia, was published in Amsterdam by De Bezige Bij in 2014. His poetry has been translated in several different languages; with translations of his poems appearing in poetry anthologies published in France, Germany and Italy, and on Poetry International and lyrikline. Erik is editor of Terras magazine [http://tijdschriftterras.nl/] and lives and works as a freelance writer in Amsterdam.

website: http://www.eriklindner.nl/

Featured Writer Erik Lindner: ‘One Poem’

 

 

Featured Writer Erik Lindner: ‘One Poem’

The sea is purple at Piraeus.

A flag creeps out of the campanile
when the wind turns.

A man steps over a dog.
A woman stoops to rub her eyelid.

In an umbrella shop an umbrella falls off the counter.

A pigeon perching on a narrow branch
falls off, flutters, and settles again.
The berry out of reach at the end of the twig.
The branch that bends, the ruff that bulges when the pigeon shuffles along.

A girl gets on the metro with a desk drawer.

On the thick sand by the breakers
an angler slides his rod out horizontally
a bike beside him on its kickstand.

He stands with legs apart as if he’s peeing.
Birds’ footprints in the sand.
The rod arches over the sea.

– Erik Lindner

translated from Dutch by Francis Jones

 

De zee is paars bij Piraeus.

Een vlag kruipt uit de klokkentoren
als de wind draait.

Een man stapt over een hond.
Een vrouw wrijft gebogen over haar ooglid.

In een parapluwinkel valt een paraplu van de toonbank.

Op een smalle tak zit een duif
die erafvalt, fladdert en opnieuw gaat zitten
de bes die te ver op het uiteinde van de twijg zit
de tak die doorbuigt, de kraag die opbolt als de duif verschuift.

Een meisje stapt in de metro met een bureaula.

Op het dikke zand aan de branding
schuift een visser horizontaal zijn hengel uit
een fiets staat naast hem op de standaard.

Hij staat wijdbeens alsof hij plast.
Vogelpootafdrukken in het zand.
De hengel kromt boven de zee.

– Erik Lindner

 

This untitled poem by Erik Lindner was first published in his fourth collection of poetry, Terrein (De Bezige Bij, Amsterdam, 2010). It has since been translated into several different languages and was published on lyrikline in 2014 and the Poetry International Web in 2016. The original poem in Dutch, alongside the translation into English by Francis Jones, has been republished in Rochford Street Review with the author’s permission.

 

“The more I travel, the more I notice that poetry in every country, means something different. And then I mean, not only what it consists of, even where that is understood. In every country, poetry is presented differently, it takes another place in the culture. What is understood by poetry seems to say something characteristic about that culture. I gather impressions that illustrate this idea: experiences, anecdotes, messages and letters. Images of what I find in the street, meetings. Sometimes it’s not about poetry at all.”

– Erik Lindner

 

Erik Lindner reads ‘De zee is paars bij Piraeus’ (Literaturwerkstatt Berlin, 2014) published on lyrikline: https://www.lyrikline.org/en/poems/de-zee-paars-bij-piraeus-5879#.WgfG-MaWbIU


 

Erik Lindner. photograph by Gerald Zörner

Erik Lindner. photograph by Gerald Zörner

Erik Lindner, poet, writer, and literary critic, was born in 1968 in The Hague, Netherlands. He has published five volumes of poetry, including his debut collection, Tramontane (Uitgeverij Perdu, 1996), and the novel, Naar Whitebridge. His most recent collection of poetry, Acedia, was published in Amsterdam by De Bezige Bij in 2014. His poetry has been translated in several different languages; with translations of his poems appearing in poetry anthologies published in France, Germany and Italy, and on Poetry International and lyrikline. Erik is editor of Terras magazine [http://tijdschriftterras.nl/] and lives and works as a freelance writer in Amsterdam.

website: http://www.eriklindner.nl/

 

 

A World of Inner and Outer Captivity: Suzanne Bellamy launches ‘Dark Matters’ by Susan Hawthorne

Dark Matters by Susan Hawthorne was launched by Suzanne Bellamy at Muse in Canberra on 24 October 2017

My friendship with Susan Hawthorne, writer and publisher at Spinifex Press – the author being celebrated here tonight at Muse – stretches back over decades now. I can assure you that we have done a great deal of hilarious laughing over those years, and I am emphasizing that humour at the outset because the subject matter of Susan’s novel isn’t funny, it’s confronting, which is a little tough on the person doing the launch. Susan’s novel is deeply involved in the dark matters of torture, but I remind you at the start that this is creative writing, this is the creation of a textual art space, this is the business of the artist, to take the reader to hard places and bring them out again. This is not torture, this is art practice, a novel of exploration of dark matter.

FORM. The form of the novel is striking. The first visual impact of the novel on the reader, its physicality, is of scattered fragments on the page, scraps and movement, not a continuous unfolding narrative. This is a puzzle, a mystery building over time and place, locked inside several brains and memories. The reader is a participant from the start, sorting out the puzzle. You cannot sit outside and observe, you enter and try to sort out the fragments. Time sequences shift, you don’t know what’s happening, the gaps in the paper on the page create the presence of the book’s most important presence, SILENCE. There is a lot of Silence, of unknowns. And yet the text is unified, there is a story, there is a kind of shifting reality, it emerges fitfully, it is visible. There is sound, vibrations, Voices, broken bits of lives and possibilities. Three narrators act as a broken chorus and lead us through a horror story of sorts, across complicated time, geographies, memories, inventions. Deeply individualised and yet linked to broad political events, there are threads of a common story among women somehow reunited in the crazy maze of patriarchal overlay, from one girl’s curiosity through family explorations to the terrible history of whole countries.

LANGUAGE.  In all of Susan Hawthorne’s writings across several genres, language itself is her central engagement. She has a core fascination, creatively and as a scholar, with all kinds of language; text, signs, symbols, sounds, body language, sound language, animal language vegetal consciousness in general. She is also a scholar of Ancient Languages, the archaeology of language, visual verbal, and held in Silence. This stretches also to made-up language, Origin Myths about words. Underlying all that word focus flows the great river of women writers and artists, the long line of women, known and unknown, the women writers and artists that are her/our heritage. In all the previous books of poetry and a verse novel including Cow (2011), Limen (2013), Lupa and Lamb (2014), Earth’s Breath (2009), The Butterfly Effect (2005) these rich voices of the past echo and reinvent themselves in the pages, an intertext of women’s creative heritage, and the core of Susan’s feminism and lesbianism. In this new novel too, they are layered into the text in subtle and obvious ways. Here are language fragments from the deep past, women’s cultural threads sometimes open sometimes hidden away for survival, here is CODE, hieroglyphics, pictographs, scratches of meaning and messages.

Susan has indeed chosen to write in many forms over the last few decades – essays, poems, novels, theory, a quiz book, translation. What unites all these structures and ways of speaking is her core vision, and she has found multiple ways to show us what she sees, what she knows, what she wants, what she doesn’t understand, and what pains her. I know she has been carrying around a version of this novel a long time, and so now it is here, Dark Matters.

I wonder, why now it emerges? Why the novel form now? This is in fact her first return to the form of the novel since The Falling Woman back in 1992. My own speculation on this question is because this form allows a lot of freedom to incorporate all her ways of seeing. It seems to have a looseness that can fold many things into it, unlike a poem, freer than a long essay, released from the disciplines of factual reality.  As a novel, it is deeply poetic, almost in parts a kind of prose poem. Susan has created a tool that can invoke multiplicity and looseness. There is here Voice, story, memory, myth building, myth recovery, invention and certainly deep POLITICS. This is her territory and always has been in our long association as friends, political allies, creative sisters, and for me as a reader of the work. A World is Remembered, Created new, Reimagined, And We are in it, Susan’s line. The intertext presences in this novel are layered, dense and subtle in parts and sometimes right in your face. Sappho of course, the great ancestor, plus Stein, Woolf, Monique Wittig, Mary Daly, Leonora Carrington (the hearing trumpet appears), the women of the Surrealist movement.  The beloved literature and art of our generation of lesbian artists and writers and scholars is all here, woven into the textual underlay.

On TORTURE.  There were matters that I needed to think deeply about and address here tonight, on the ethical depiction of horror and torture. We are surrounded by this material in popular culture but for the artist they are serious themes to consider. How to represent this creatively? How to be transformative, and not just dump trauma on the reader? How to convey horror and yet also be effective? How does this function for a woman writing about women and torture, how to write about it? The torture of lesbians and women has been part of the Great Silence, but how to convey it with power and responsibility, not as desensitized or voyeuristic or pornographic? This is not a new question and women writers have considered it in many ways. In a recent book about Hannah Arendt, Susan Sontag and others, (Tough Enough by Deborah Nelson, 2017) the author says “Causing Pain to the Reader is sometimes acceptable.”  The 20th C, a century of trauma was also one of traumatic representation.  “The problem is not that we do not know what is happening but that we cannot bear to be changed by that knowledge when we do know.” Now in the 21st C, an escalation and normalization of torture presents this to artists in a whole new way. How do you write about it? What form do you choose?

Writer and Sculptor Kate Millett, who died only recently, also puzzled over how to convey torture and cruelty, in her books The Basement (1979), about the torture and murder of Sylvia Likens in 1965, and also in The Politics of Cruelty (1994). But it was in her Sculpture, in the non-verbal space that she explored the Uses of Torture most powerfully, creating a world of inner and outer captivity, programmatic torture. Susan Sontag, in Regarding The Pain of Others, addressed this question of torture in photographs, considering how Virginia Woolf in her book Three Guineas chose which photos of dead children in the Spanish Civil War not to use. The point is that artists and writers make choices, ask what the purpose and limits are in recreating the dark matter of torture.

How has Susan thought and written about this? I know she has considered it for many years. We have talked about it, as she has sought out and researched torture particularly about lesbians. In this novel she has made choices, great ones. It is graphic and powerful but somehow it also cleans and transcends and empowers the reader. Certainly it did me. The body sensates the realities of torture in complex responses, fear, pain anticipation, creative dissociation, and the brain is very present. We are of course outsiders but we are made to be there and think through the matter, the dark matter, and stay grounded and still think about what is happening. Always we know deeply this is art space not a torture room.

The Story of Lesbians on Planet Earth preoccupies some of us very much, it being a fugitive tale with uncertain outcomes and endings. Attacks on the very word and language of Lesbian in the 21st C are a new challenge. Lesbia Sapiens Magnificata as a Form finds itself under threat again, the very word. Susan in this novel invokes “an Imaginary Encyclopedia about Lesbians. A Universe in which lesbian symbols lie at the centre.” This I think actually describes all her work. The novel echoes all her previous work and takes a courageous step into territory made invisible by old fears no longer able to be contained. The times of Silence are over.

As to Susan’s larger project. Spinifex Press is a remarkable experiment in feminist publishing, a triumph of survival. It continues to produce clear voices in real books in hard times. It is its own kind of marvellous reality, and I celebrate the books and the women.

 – Suzanne Bellamy


 Suzanne Bellamy is an artist and a scholar. She has produced works in porcelain for many years. Her prints often reference artists such as Virginia Woolf and Gertrude Stein. In 1996 she created the art performance/ archive installation The Lost Culture of Women’s Liberation 1969-74, the Pre-Dynastic Phase, an archaeological, activist women’s history project, which has now been presented many times both in Australia and in the USA in museum or slide/performance format. Suzanne Bellamy’s artwork appears on the cover of Dark Matters (Road Map 2004. Etched embossed monoprint on Fabriano paper). The image interprets a photograph of Mitochondria, the Motherline DNA, from an old Scientific American photograph. She is currently completing a PhD in Australian Studies at the University of Sydney.

Dark Matters is available from  http://www.spinifexpress.com.au/Bookstore/book/id=297/

Featured Writer Marra PL. Lanot: One Poem

Soldier’s Song

Let the hills and mountains
Roll up behind me like
The tangled past of a jungle.
Let a rose grow when
I lay down my gun
Where the desert meets the shore.

I long to throw away
This mask of maleness,
All male desire to kill,
To spit the blood, the sour –
Ness balled in my mouth.
I have forgotten the face
Of my mother, sister, niece.
All I see are trenches
Hate burrowed in my brother’s face,
His eyes, two barrels of a gun
Unleashing bullets.
I have learned that foes
May become friends tomorrow
And friends my foes tonight.

This season I may own a
Bowl of rice, next year
I might bite a fruit
Or have a new dress
Or a roof over our heads.
But I remember home
Each time a child
Presses a cheek to mine
Or even when a horse
Gives birth and goats
Cavort in a manger.

Let the hills and mountains
Roll up behind me like
The tangled past of a jungle.
Let a rose grow when
I lay down my gun
Where the desert meets the shore.

-Marra PL. Lanot

 

‘Soldier’s Song’ by Marra PL. Lanot was first published in Asiaweek and then included in Marra’s fourth collection of poetry, Witch’s Dance at Iba Pang Tula sa Filipino at Español (2000, Anvil Publishing). Marra PL. Lanot is a multilingual poet who wrote ‘Soldier’s Song’ in English. Witch’s Dance contains in poems written in English, Tagalog, and Spanish. Rochford Street Review is proud to republish ‘Soldier’s Song’ with the permission of the author.


 

Marra PL. Lanot. photograph by Ed Lejano

Marra PL. Lanot. photograph by Ed Lejano

Marra PL. Lanot is a Filipino poet, essayist, and a freelance journalist who writes in Filipino, English, and Spanish. She has published several books, including five collections of poetry, three collections of profiles, and a book of essays, in addition to co-writing several teleplays. She previously taught literature, creative writing, and film at the University of the Philippines, her alma mater. She also served as Associate Artistic Director of the Cultural Center of the Philippines as well as Board Member of the Movie and Television Rating and Classification Board. She has won several awards for her work, including the Catholic Mass Media Award, and the prestigious Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards for Literature. She received second prize for Poetry in the Palanca Awards for her first collection of poetry, Sheaves of Things Burning (1967). Her fifth collection of poetry, Riding the Full Moon in Filipino and Spanish, continues to demonstrate her ability to write in multiple languages as does her forthcoming collection, Cadena de Amor, New and Selected Poems in English, Filipino, and Spanish, due to be published this year.

 

Featured Writer Marra PL. Lanot: Biographical Note

Marra PL. Lanot. photograph by Ed Lejano

Marra PL. Lanot. photograph by Ed Lejano

 

Marra PL. Lanot is a Filipino poet, essayist, and a freelance journalist who writes in Filipino, English, and Spanish. She has published several books, including five collections of poetry, three collections of profiles, and a book of essays, in addition to co-writing several teleplays. She previously taught literature, creative writing, and film at the University of the Philippines, her alma mater. She also served as Associate Artistic Director of the Cultural Center of the Philippines as well as Board Member of the Movie and Television Rating and Classification Board. She has won several awards for her work, including the Catholic Mass Media Award, and the prestigious Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards for Literature. She received second prize for Poetry in the Palanca Awards for her first collection of poetry, Sheaves of Things Burning (1967). Her fifth collection of poetry, Riding the Full Moon in Filipino and Spanish, continues to demonstrate her ability to write in multiple languages as does her forthcoming collection, Cadena de Amor, New and Selected Poems in English, Filipino, and Spanish due to be published this year.

Featured Writer Marra PL. Lanot: ‘Soldier’s Song’

 

Featured Writer Maarja Kangro: One Poem

Asbestos

So, as a child, you say?
You jumped,
and the pile of Eternit cracked?
Blue sneakers, white chrysotile.
I saw the enlargement
of a 10 micrometre fiber
entering the respiratory system.
A piece of Eternit
was meant to be smoked fish?
You nibbled at it
like original sin?
Like the tree of the knowledge of good and evil:
actually, you don’t feel anything,
don’t understand much,
10μm, a construction worker in filthy trousers,
an agony of an ignorant mind,
20 or 40 years, pleural plaques, mesothelioma,
scar tissue in the lungs.
Yes, every year, it seems, the lilac blooms,
and sometimes a big passion.
The fiber descends very slowly,
invisibly like the future.
A great allegory, asbestos.
Oh, don’t be mad now!
Look, this is my new favourite wine.
I’ll buy. Let’s have a glass tonight.

-Maarja Kangro

Translated from Estonian by Brandon Lussier and the author, Maarja Kangro

 

Asbest

Ah et juba lapsena?
Hüppasid,
ja eterniidivirn pragises?
Sinised tennised, valge krüsotiil.
Nägin suurendust,
kuidas 10-mikromeetrine kiud
tungib hingamisteedesse.
Eterniiditükk
oli mängult suitsukala?
Näksisite
nagu pärispattu?
Nagu hea ja kurja tundmise puud:
tegelikult ei tunne ju midagi,
aru ei saa suurt millestki,
10μm, räpastes pükstes ehitaja,
aimuta inimese agoonia,
20 või 40 aastat, pleuranaastud, mesotelioom,
sidekoestunud kops.
Jah, igal aastal justkui õitseb sirel
ja mõnikord suur kirg.
Kiud laskub väga aeglaselt
ja nähtamatult nagu tulevik:
asbest on vägev allegooria.
Oh, mis sa vihastad!
Näe, siin on mu uus lemmikvein.
Ma ostan. Teeme õhtul klaasikese.

-Maarja Kangro

 

Asbest’ by Maarja Kangro was first published in Estonian in the magazine Looming (2009) and was also included in her poetry collection Kunstiteadlase jõulupuu (The Christmas Tree of an Art Scholar) published by Eesti Keele Sihtasutus in 2010. The English translation, ‘Asbestos’ was first published on lyrikline.org. The original poem, ‘Asbest’, alongside the English translation, ‘Asbestos’, have been republished in Rochford Street Review with the author’s permission.


 

Maarja Kangro photograph by Jüri Kolk copy

Maarja Kangro. photograph by Jüri Kolk

Maarja Kangro is an Estonian poet, author, and translator who has been described as one of the most formidable voices in contemporary Estonia. By the age of forty, she had won many of the important literary awards in Estonia. In 2006, she published her first book of poems, Kurat õrnal lumel (A Devil on Tender Snow), as well as, a children’s book, Puuviljadraakon (Fruit Dragon), illustrated by her sister, Kirke Kangro. Puuviljadraakon also received the Estonian Children’s Literature Centre’s Best Book of the Year Award in 2006. She won the Tallinn University Literary Award for her second and third collections of poems: Tule mu koopasse, mateeria (Come into my Cave, Matter) in 2008 and Heureka (Eureka) in 2009. She received the Estonian Cultural Endowment’s Literary Award for poetry in 2009 for Heureka, as well as, for prose in 2011 for Ahvid ja solidaarsus (Monkeys and Solidarity). She has also written several opera librettos, a cantata, and a multimedia work, To Define Happiness.

 

Featured Writer Maarja Kangro: Biographical Note

Maarja Kangro photograph by Jüri Kolk copy

Maarja Kangro. photograph by Jüri Kolk

 

Maarja Kangro is an Estonian poet, author, and translator who has been described as one of the most formidable voices in contemporary Estonia. By the age of forty, she had won many of the important literary awards in Estonia. In 2006, she published her first book of poems, Kurat õrnal lumel (A Devil on Tender Snow), as well as, a children’s book, Puuviljadraakon (Fruit Dragon), illustrated by her sister, Kirke Kangro. Puuviljadraakon also received the Estonian Children’s Literature Centre’s Best Book of the Year Award in 2006. She won the Tallinn University Literary Award for her second and third collections of poems: Tule mu koopasse, mateeria (Come into my Cave, Matter) in 2008 and Heureka (Eureka) in 2009. She received the Estonian Cultural Endowment’s Literary Award for poetry in 2009 for Heureka, as well as, for prose in 2011 for Ahvid ja solidaarsus (Monkeys and Solidarity). She has also written several opera librettos, a cantata, and a multimedia work, To Define Happiness.

Featured Writer Maarja Kangro: ‘Asbestos’ (‘Asbest’)

 

Featured Writer Ingrid Fichtner: One Poem

‘Thinking about Things’ and ‘So nachdenken’ “were ‘born’ at the same time; in a way, both versions are originals. Which makes me think right now – one could view any poem as a kind of translation, within one language usually … When I’m in touch with English-speaking friends, I sometimes start out writing a poem in English. And in this case, I actually prefer the English version.” – Ingrid Fichtner

 

Thinking about Things

and how they threaten you
you try to fight
you try to vanish
you fail
you try again
you are not failing any better
you try to change your mind
and your perception
is still misleading you
you try again
you shut your eyes –
might the adventure then lead you
to castles and maybe in Spain –
your ears cannot shut off the windmills
you try to reconsider things
you fall in love with them

 

So nachdenken

über die Dinge
und wie sie dich bedrohen
du versuchst ihnen zu trotzen
du versuchst dich ihnen zu entziehen
doch du scheiterst
du versuchst es wieder
und du scheiterst gar nicht besser
du möchtest sie gern anders sehen
deine Wahrnehmung
führt dich noch immer in die Irre
du versuchst es wieder –
könnte dieses Abenteuer dich
vielleicht zu Schlössern führen und seien sie aus Luft –
deine Ohren können Windmühlen nicht abstellen
du versuchst die Dinge neu zu überdenken
und verliebst dich schlicht in sie

-Ingrid Fichtner

Ingrid Fichtner wrote ‘Thinking about Things’ (‘So nachdenken’) bilingually, in English and German, respectively.


 

Ingrid Fichtner. photograph by Rahul Soni

Ingrid Fichtner. photograph by Rahul Soni

Ingrid Fichtner was born in Judenburg, Austria and has been living in Switzerland since 1985. Ingrid is an award-winning poet who has written seven books of poetry, two libretti, and works as a freelance translator. She has won awards and scholarships from the City of Zurich and Pro Helvetia through her collections of poetry including, Lichte Landschaft (2012), Luftblaumesser (2004), Das Wahnsinnige am Binden Schuhe (2000), and Farbtreiben (1999). Her most recent book of poems is Von weitem (Wolfbach, Zürich 2014). Translations of her poetry have appeared in journals and anthologies in English, French, Polish, Spanish, and Malayalam. She has a Master of Arts from Vienna University.

website: http://www.ingridfichtner.ch

 

Featured Writer Ingrid Fichtner: Biographical Note

Ingrid Fichtner. photograph by Rahul Soni

Ingrid Fichtner. photograph by Rahul Soni

 

Ingrid Fichtner was born in Judenburg, Austria and has been living in Switzerland since 1985. Ingrid is an award-winning poet who has written seven books of poetry, two libretti, and works as a freelance translator. She has won awards and scholarships from the City of Zurich and Pro Helvetia through her collections of poetry including, Lichte Landschaft (2012), Luftblaumesser (2004), Das Wahnsinnige am Binden Schuhe (2000), and Farbtreiben (1999). Her most recent book of poems is Von weitem (Wolfbach, Zürich 2014). Translations of her poetry have appeared in journals and anthologies in English, French, Polish, Spanish, and Malayalam. She has a Master of Arts from Vienna University.

website: http://www.ingridfichtner.ch

Featured Writer Ingrid Fichtner: ‘Thinking about Things’ (‘So nachdenken’)

Featured Writer Lidija Dimkovska (Лидија Димковска): Biographical Note

!Lidija Dimkovska photograph by Tihomir Pintar

Lidija Dimkovska. photograph by Tihomir Pintar

 

Lidija Dimkovska (Лидија Димковска) was born in Skopje, Macedonia, and currently lives in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Lidija is a poet, novelist, essayist, and translator of Romanian and Slovenian literature into Macedonian. She has published six books of poetry, three novels and edited three anthologies. Lidija has won numerous literary prizes including, the Hubert Burda literary prize for young East European poets (2009), the Tudor Arghezi international poetry prize in Romania (2012), the Macedonian Writers’ Union award twice, and the European Union Prize for Literature (2013) for her novel, A Spare Life (РЕЗЕРВЕН ЖИВОТ). Her book of poems, pH Neutral History, was translated into English by Ljubica Arsovska and Peggy Reid. Her books have been translated into more than twenty languages and she has participated at numerous international literary festivals.

Featured Writer Lidija Dimkovska (Лидија Димковска): ‘Echo’ (‘Ехо’)